eye2.jpg
eye2.jpg

director's staement


"Two years into having moved from Montreal to Toronto, I met a girl who I became infatuated with. On my own, and feeling out of the element, it felt like a blessing to have finally met someone I felt connected to, someone I wanted to get to know on an intimate level.

Unfortunately, my understanding of the situation was completely misinterpreted on my end. Her perspective was we were "just friends" and wanted no more than that. On top of that, she already had a boyfriend.

This revelation hurt deeply because I genuinely felt connected with her and that she must have known my feelings towards her. As time went on, I realized that chasing someone who was unavailable and not interested was doing me no good at all, and that I owed it to myself to move on.

Watching the film now, I realize that making this movie was a way for me to have some form of closure (of a relationship that never was). I am someone who is very much governed by emotion and each time I watch STREAMER, the memory of the humiliation, fear and pain of rejection hits me. Even now, this very notion of letting my guard down with someone, being emotionally vulnerable with them and not having this act reciprocated, overwhelms me.

In this culture of social media that we live in, it is very easy to look at other peoples' lives and feel worse about our own. Friends and friends of friends so seemingly happy, "living the dream" daily, it's easy nowadays to wind up feeling like the ostracized loner.

So now I see STREAMER as this subtle cautionary tale of not getting too comfortable with the way things are. Communication is essential, and when we can't take the opportunity to connect, vent, or complain to someone, sometimes, the isolation of not having this shoulder to cry on, can be dangerous."

-- Jared Bratt (co-writer, co-director)

SCROLL DOWN

director's staement


"Two years into having moved from Montreal to Toronto, I met a girl who I became infatuated with. On my own, and feeling out of the element, it felt like a blessing to have finally met someone I felt connected to, someone I wanted to get to know on an intimate level.

Unfortunately, my understanding of the situation was completely misinterpreted on my end. Her perspective was we were "just friends" and wanted no more than that. On top of that, she already had a boyfriend.

This revelation hurt deeply because I genuinely felt connected with her and that she must have known my feelings towards her. As time went on, I realized that chasing someone who was unavailable and not interested was doing me no good at all, and that I owed it to myself to move on.

Watching the film now, I realize that making this movie was a way for me to have some form of closure (of a relationship that never was). I am someone who is very much governed by emotion and each time I watch STREAMER, the memory of the humiliation, fear and pain of rejection hits me. Even now, this very notion of letting my guard down with someone, being emotionally vulnerable with them and not having this act reciprocated, overwhelms me.

In this culture of social media that we live in, it is very easy to look at other peoples' lives and feel worse about our own. Friends and friends of friends so seemingly happy, "living the dream" daily, it's easy nowadays to wind up feeling like the ostracized loner.

So now I see STREAMER as this subtle cautionary tale of not getting too comfortable with the way things are. Communication is essential, and when we can't take the opportunity to connect, vent, or complain to someone, sometimes, the isolation of not having this shoulder to cry on, can be dangerous."

-- Jared Bratt (co-writer, co-director)